Doctoral Research in Education in Emergencies

9 Sep

A quick, quick followup to last week’s post: INEE’s online discussion series on “Teaching Education in Emergencies” continues this week with posts by The Brookings Institution’s Allison Anderson (former director of INEE), Harvard’s Sarah Dryden-Peterson (a huge inspiration for my own research) and none other than NYU’s own Amy Kapit!

Amy provides some wonderful insights into a few lessons-learned while conducting her doctoral research and collecting data in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. Her reflections touch on the utility of qualitative methodologies and the plethora of doctoral research opportunities in the field of education in emergencies, while highlighting some innovative research coming out of NYU’s IE Program. I also particularly liked her piece because it addresses a key factor for me personally in deciding to delay my entrance into a doctoral degree program: the benefits of solidifying connections in the field prior to conducting doctoral research. Keeping my personal focus on forced displacement in East Africa in mind, studying with Amy helped me and many others in IE realize the importance of having a strong network of practitioners in our regions of interest prior to beginning data collection, which many of us are now using our entry/mid-level career paths to do. We at HREC all wish her the best as she finishes up her doctoral work! Give it a read, and check out the other online blog posts and discussions over on INEE’s website – and don’t forget to keep an eye out for Dr. Dana Burde’s post on September 23rd!

On that note, for those of you starting your Fall semester at NYU or Columbia (or anywhere!), I highly recommend looking into a training seminar on “INEE’s Minimum Standards for Education: Preparedness, Response, Recovery.” It’s a great community in which to be involved, and it may just change the course of your graduate studies…

Additionally, Allison Anderson makes mention of INEE’s academic space on its website – this is a growing resource to see what other academics are researching in the field of EiE, and also a great resource for submitting your own research down the road.

Okay, so that wasn’t a quick, quick followup.

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